Tuesday, 28 June 2011

AROMATIC CHICKEN CURRY


My family love curries, all sorts of curry. Part of the fun of eating it is having all the accompanying breads and poppadoms to dip in the sauce. 

Today I cooked an aromatic chicken curry. I can't eat too spicy so this is on the mild side. It won't make you reach for a drink with every spoonful nor numb your tongue. This is not of any particular style of curry but just how I cook curry. I am not very good with remembering a lot of ingredients so there's only a few here.

Friday, 24 June 2011

SHELL-ON CRAB AND CORN CHOWDER

We can't seem to have enough of crabs. While it's in season, we eat a lot of it. Today, I made a crab and corn chowder. I've left the meat in the shells. The shells makes the soup taste so rich, briny and really crabby (!). Also, this is supposed to be a quick and easy to cook dish. I don't want to slave all day picking the flesh off the crab shell. Flaked crab meat tends to fall apart when cooked leaving you just mush to chew on rather than the big tasty morsels that you coax off the shell.

Tuesday, 21 June 2011

TAHITIAN PORK (PORK WITH STAR ANISE AND PINEAPPLE)


This is a dish that I used to cook a lot when I was young. If I remember right, I found the recipe in one of those women's magazines. I had a collection of clippings and I still have some of them up to now. 

Food then had funny titles like these. A lot had names of places but in no way are they connected. Pineapples seem to conjure scenes of the tropics so the names Tahitian, Polynesian, Hawaiian were often used as suggestive tags. 

Friday, 17 June 2011

WHITE CHOCOLATE AND MANGO MINI SANS RIVAL



Sans Rival is a classic Filipino dessert which simply means without rival. It is unrivaled in decadence because of the amount of butter, eggs and nuts it contains. Several layers of meringue with chopped cashews are frosted and filled with cream mousseline (eggyolks, sugar syrup and butter). More chopped nuts pepper the whole cake. It is truly delicious but too rich and too sweet.


Diona of Tita Flips and I are the hosts this month at the Kulinarya Cooking Club. We have chosen a white theme for the wedding month of June. I have chosen to simplify and deconstruct the elaborate sans rival (nearly destroy also). I have made meringue wafers instead of sheets, filled with mango curd and drizzled with white chocolate ganache. They are not as impressive in looks as a big gateau but what they lack in looks is made up for by the taste.



Ingredients for the meringue wafer:


1 cup of egg whites
1 cup sugar
1 cup of chopped cashews
1/2 tsp. vanilla


Method:


Draw 3" circles on a sheet of paper to make a template for your meringue wafers. 

Cut sheets of non-stick baking parchment to line your baking sheets with. Put the template in between the baking sheet and baking parchment. You will need about 4 sheets of baking parchment. 


Prepare your meringue. Whisk the egg with an electric mixer until frothy. Gradually add the sugar and whisk until stiff. Fold in the chopped nuts and vanilla extract. Transfer to a piping 
bag with a plain nozzle.


Using the template as a guide, pipe circles on the baking parchment, starting from the edge then going towards the center. Keep the nozzle close to the paper to make thin discs. Pull out the template before putting the pan in the oven and use the template for the rest of the baking parchment sheets. 

Bake at 230° F/ 110° C for 30 minutes or until crisp and dry. Let the meringue cool down before carefully peeling off the paper.




Transfer to a cooling rack. Prepare the filling.










Ingredients for the mango curd:


1 1/2 c. mango purée
1/3 c. sugar
7 egg yolks
1 tbsp. corn flour (corn starch)
1 tbsp. water
2 tbsps. butter


I used tinned sweet Alphonso mango purée for this that's why it's darker in colour. You can puree fresh mangoes. 

Put the mango purée, sugar and egg yolks in a sauce pan and blend together. Cook on low heat until it boils. Mix the corn flour and flour together and add to the mango mixture while stirring. Continue cooking until thick. 

Transfer to another bowl and set a circle of parchment paper on the surface to prevent skin from forming. Leave to cool, then refrigerate.


For the white chocolate ganache:


100 mls. double cream
200 gms. white chocolate


Chop the white chocolate roughly and transfer to a mixing bowl. Put the cream in  a microwaveable container and heat for 45 seconds. Pour over the chocolate and whisk until it melts and the mixture becomes smooth. Leave to cool.


To assemble:


You'll need 5 wafers per mini cake. Spread a little bit of mango curd in between the wafers. I put a bit too much. It tastes nice but made the wafers soft. 

Drizzle with the ganache. Decorate as you like. I used slivers of dried mango and chopped cashews. Refrigerate, then serve chilled.



This post is  for the KULINARYA COOKING CLUB theme for June 2011: White.

See the posts of the other members by visiting their blogs.




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You might also like 
                                                Peach and Mango Trifle
Peach and Mango Biscotten Torte
Brazo de Mercedes
Thanks for dropping by. It would be nice if we could meet up on FACEBOOK or TWITTER

Tuesday, 14 June 2011

LUMPIANG SHANGHAI



There are a lot of Filipino dishes which have place names attached to them even if they have no connection to them whatsoever. Lumpiang Shanghai is one of such dishes. 

Lumpia means spring roll in Tagalog. It can be a fresh vegetable filled one or a fried one with a variety of fillings. This one is a fried mini spring roll with a mixture of pork and prawn filling. I think what the name merely means is that it is cooked in the Chinese style. 

Saturday, 11 June 2011

CHICKEN ALA JAO (CHICKEN ADOBO IN LIVER SAUCE)


This dish, although not one of the town's classic fares, was invented in Marikina. It was the innovation of a couple named Henry and Naty Jao who were poultry retailers at the town market. The chicken is mildly flavoured with adobo seasonings then is sautéed with chopped onions and ground chicken liver. 

Thursday, 9 June 2011

SALTED DUCK EGGS (ITLOG NA MAALAT)


Salted eggs can be bought ready prepared. It is sometimes sold in the Oriental shops salted but uncooked. In the Philippines, it is sold already cooked and coloured a very deep pink to differentiate it from chicken eggs. We call it itlog na maalat which simply means salty eggs. 

They are traditionally buried in salty clay for several days after which they absorb the salty taste through their porous shells. The egg whites are salty and creamy and the egg yolks are firm,  bright yellow and rich tasting, with oil exuding from them after boiling. The whole egg yolks are prized by the Chinese and are used as filling for mooncakes to symbolize the moon. 


It is a very common side dish by itself or can also be mixed with diced tomatoes as a kind of salsa to accompany fried dishes or added to salads to add a salty creamy taste similar to feta cheese. It is also used as a topping for rice cakes. Commercial salted eggs are sometimes far too salty for my liking. I sometimes make it at home so I can make it less salty. 


Ingredients:


up to 12 duck eggs
5 cups of water
1 1/2 c. salt
red or dark pink food colouring
1 tbsp. vinegar


Bring 5 cups of water to a boil. Add 1 1/2 cups of salt and stir  until most of the salt has dissolved. Leave the solution to cool, then transfer to a glass or plastic jar with a lid. 

Make sure that the eggs are free from cracks. Add the eggs. The eggs has to be completely submerged in the liquid. Put a cup on top of the eggs and let it fill with liquid to weigh down the eggs and prevent them from floating to the surface. 

Keep in a cool dark place (such as a cupboard) for 21 days. You can boil one egg at this point and taste it. If you want it saltier, you can keep it in the salt solution for a day or two more. 

Drain the water off and rinse the eggs with water. You can store the eggs in the fridge like this and boil them before serving.  You can also boil them all and keep in the fridge. They are preserved by the salting process and can last for several months in the fridge.


To cook, put eggs in a sauce pan, cover with water and simmer on low heat for five minutes. You can add a few drops of food colouring if you want an authentic bright pink colour. Add 1 tbsp. of vinegar to make the colouring adhere to the egg shells. 


All rights reserved ©Adora's Box Copyright 2011. 

Salted eggs go well with

Sweet and Spicy Beef Tapa

Bibingka with Mozarella and Cheddar
(substitute the mozarella with salted eggs)
Steamed Rice cake with Salted Eggs
Thanks for dropping by. Please let me know what you think of this post.

Tuesday, 7 June 2011

FISH STEAKS WITH SWEET LIME AND CORIANDER SAUCE



An idyllic life for me and my family would probably be living near the sea. We just love fish and all types of seafood. It is not easy to access fresh fish in London but we are lucky enough to have a few good sources in our area. We eat fish as much as we can, usually at lunch time and always with rice. That, for us, is the perfect combination.  

Sunday, 5 June 2011

PAPRIKA RICE (JAVA RICE)


This dish is my version of a very popular rice dish in the Philippines called Java rice. It is in no way connected to the place Java. It was popularized by a restaurant called Aristocrat which is known for their barbecue chicken. 

Friday, 3 June 2011

BARBECUE LEG OF LAMB WITH ROSEMARY AND GARLIC


Leg of lamb is a family favourite. We have it twice a year: for my daughter's birthday and for Easter Sunday. It can be rather pricey so it isn't something we eat all the time. When I found that leg of lamb was on offer at the supermarket, I decided to take advantage of it and have an extra this year. 

COUSCOUS WITH APRICOTS, SULTANAS AND TOASTED PINE NUTS



Couscous are tiny granules made with semolina which is the staple food of North African countries. Couscous is one of the side dishes that I like serving with grilled meat. Its mild taste makes it a perfect base for other ingredients. 

It is an instant food. After adding boiling water, it is ready in five minutes. You can then add whatever flavouring you like or serve it plain with a drizzle of olive oil and a dash of salt. I like it best mixed with a lot of dried fruits and nuts, good olive oil and a squeeze of lemon juice. 

It is an ideal side dish for barbecues and stews. Although it is a good cupboard staple, I try not to keep it on stand by for too long as it loses its freshness rather quickly.


Ingredients:

1 1/2 c. dry couscous
1 1/2 c. boiling water
3 tbsps. extra virgin olive oil
12 apricots, cut into small cubes
1/3 c. sultanas
1/4 c. pine nuts, toasted
2 tbsps. chopped parsley
1 1/2 tbsp. lemon juice
2 tsps. ground coriander seeds
2 tsps. salt
1 tsp. sugar
1/4 tsp. black pepper


Method:


Put the cous cous in a mixing bowl. Pour the boiling water, add the olive oil and give it a stir. Cover with cling film and leave for  about five minutes. It is ready when the grains have absorbed all the liquid and the grains have plumped up. Fluff up with a fork. Add all the ingredients and stir. It is now ready to serve.



All rights reserved ©Adora's Box Copyright 2011. 

Please support Adora's Box by making your Amazon.com and mymemories.com (use the code STMMMS55174) purchases from this site. Click on their respective banners to proceed to their websites. It will not cost you a single cent more but will help sustain this blog. Thank you.


This will go well with


Barbecue Leg of Lamb with Rosemary and Garlic
Mediterranean Style Barbecue Chicken 
Lamb Hotpot with Apricots and Honey

Thanks for dropping by. It would be nice if we could meet up on FACEBOOK or TWITTER

Wednesday, 1 June 2011

SPINACH AND POTATO TORTA


 Sometime ago, there was a series of television adverts for eggs where they show a nearly empty fridge with just a carton of eggs and one other ingredient such as a sausage or an onion inside. In one of them, a young girl was in such a situation with her Dad, who was a clueless cook. So she then decides to cook the last remnants of food in the fridge and whipped up an omelette (of course). The Dad said, as a form of thanks, "You are like your Mum. You can make something out of nothing."